36 Hours in Lisbon – The New York Times

Sunday

11) 11 a.m. CAFFEINE NATION

In Portugal, as in Italy, coffee equates to espresso. For a wider variety of caffeinated options, start the morning at Fábrica Coffee Roasters. Established in 2015, this specialty coffee purveyor operates two cafes that serve traditional shots as well as cold brews, pour-overs and frothy cappuccini. At the spacious Chiado locale, order a velvety flat white, take a seat amid the plants, put away the phone (there’s no Wi-Fi) and savor your coffee.

12) 1 p.m. CARIOCA CASA

In an impressive show of reverse colonization, Brazil has taken over a magnificent mansion in Príncipe Real. Opened in April 2017, Casa Pau-Brasil is a concept shop and showroom for top Brazilian designers and brands spanning fashion, home furnishings, stationary, soaps and more. Ascend the elegant staircase, which is circled by a flock of yellow stuffed parrots, to explore the maze of rooms that recently displayed Lenny Niemeyer’s fashionable swimsuits, orange-trimmed Panama hats from Frescobol Carioca, bars of Rio’s Q chocolate, and exquisite polished-wood armchairs designed by Sérgio Rodrigues.

13) 3:30 p.m. QUIOSQUE TIME

A local initiative begun in 2009 to revive the city’s many abandoned quiosques de refresco (refreshment kiosks) is today a resounding success. With attractive Art Nouveau architecture and prime locations in plazas, parks and scenic overlooks throughout the city, these popular kiosks are natural gathering points from sunup to sundown. Join the local crowd sipping ginja, a traditional sour-cherry liqueur, at purple tables beside the restored quiosque in Praça das Flores, a small, leafy park with a central fountain that doubles as a watering hole for neighborhood cats. In inclement weather, take cover at Cerveteca Lisboa, a quiet beer bar across the street pouring hard-to-find brews from Portuguese craft breweries, like Dois Corvos and Passarola Brewing.


LODGING

Opened last year in a historic building formerly occupied by the consulate of Brazil, Le Consulat is a sophisticated hotel with eight spacious suites decorated with artworks culled from top Lisbon galleries, and views across the lovely Camões square in the central Chiado district (Praça Luís de Camões 22; 351-212-427-470; leconsulat.pt; from about 200 euros).

Another noteworthy newcomer, the Corpo Santo Lisbon Historical Hotel is an upscale property that also opened last year near the lively Cais do Sodré district, with welcoming staff, a convenient location, an on-site restaurant and 77 plush, neutral-hued rooms (Rua do Corpo Santo 25; 351-218-288-000; corposantohotel.com; from about 180 euros).

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